Top Restaurant Chain Improves Hygiene with Copper

In a world first, the most popular restaurant chain in South Korea has outfitted one of its top outlets in Seoul with antimicrobial copper, augmenting existing hygiene measures with a view to setting the gold standard for food safety.

8th March 2013

The Tosilae restaurant, one of 130 across the country, is equipped with antimicrobial copper table tops and air conditioning units. A plaque at the entrance explains their significance to customers.
 
Copper is inherently antimicrobial, meaning it will rapidly kill bacteria, viruses and fungi on contact and making it a uniquely hygienic material. The term 'antimicrobial copper' is used to describe pure copper and the many alloys (such as brass and bronze) that benefit from its sanitising property.
Won Sun Joong, CEO of Tosilae, explains the chain's move to antimicrobial copper: 'Our top priority is hygiene and food safety for our customers. We are continually raising these standards in all our restaurants, so it is just a matter of time before we introduce antimicrobial copper to the rest of the chain.'
This ground-breaking approach to hygiene improvement may be new to the restaurant environment, but hospitals around the world are already using antimicrobial copper for frequently-touched surfaces to reduce the risk of patients acquiring infections. Similarly, air conditioning units containing copper can help control emissions of airborne contaminants such as fungi, which can cause infections.
The products at Tosilae were supplied by Yoosung Transglobal, and all bear the Cu+ mark granted to companies using approved copper alloys with confirmed antimicrobial properties, backed by peer-reviewed and published laboratory and clinical research.
Yoo Seung Chul, CEO of Yoosung Transglobal, said of the company's antimicrobial copper range: 'Our ultimate goal is to assist people in living healthy lives by using antimicrobial copper products in everyday life. Tosilae's adoption of antimicrobial copper surfaces is expected to raise awareness of their benefits, and will serve as a catalyst for more antimicrobial copper applications in the country.'
Already appearing in public spaces such as airports, subway stations and libraries to reduce the risk of infections spreading in areas where people gather in large numbers, antimicrobial copper is now poised to revolutionise the dining experience in South Korea and, as other countries look for innovations in hygiene, across the world.
 
Copper is inherently antimicrobial, meaning it will rapidly kill bacteria, viruses and fungi on contact and making it a uniquely hygienic material. The term 'antimicrobial copper' is used to describe pure copper and the many alloys (such as brass and bronze) that benefit from its sanitising property.
 
Won Sun Joong, CEO of Tosilae, explains the chain's move to antimicrobial copper: 'Our top priority is hygiene and food safety for our customers. We are continually raising these standards in all our restaurants, so it is just a matter of time before we introduce antimicrobial copper to the rest of the chain.'
 
This ground-breaking approach to hygiene improvement may be new to the restaurant environment, but hospitals around the world are already using antimicrobial copper for frequently-touched surfaces to reduce the risk of patients acquiring infections. Similarly, air conditioning units containing copper can help control emissions of airborne contaminants such as fungi, which can cause infections.
 
The products at Tosilae were supplied by Yoosung Transglobal, and all bear the Cu+ mark granted to companies using approved copper alloys with confirmed antimicrobial properties, backed by peer-reviewed and published laboratory and clinical research.
 
Yoo Seung Chul, CEO of Yoosung Transglobal, said of the company's antimicrobial copper range: 'Our ultimate goal is to assist people in living healthy lives by using antimicrobial copper products in everyday life. Tosilae's adoption of antimicrobial copper surfaces is expected to raise awareness of their benefits, and will serve as a catalyst for more antimicrobial copper applications in the country.'
 
Already appearing in public spaces such as airports, subway stations and libraries to reduce the risk of infections spreading in areas where people gather in large numbers, antimicrobial copper is now poised to revolutionise the dining experience in South Korea and, as other countries look for innovations in hygiene, across the world. 
 
 
  • Group
  • Copper & Health
  • CSR